Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

Eine interessante Studien zur pharyngealen Elektrostimulation (PES) bei Schlaganfallpatienten mit Dysphagie. In einer ramdomisierten Studie mit Kontrollgruppe kamen Philip M. Bath et. al. zu dem Ergebnis, dass es durch PES keinen signifikanten Einfluss auf die Dysphagie gibt.

Hintergrund

Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials.

Methoden

We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks.

Ergebnisse

In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred.

Ergebnis

In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result.


Quelle: Bath, P. M., Scutt, P., Love, J., Clavé, P., Cohen, D., Dziewas, R., … Hamdy, S. (2016). Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation, 47(6), 1562–1570. http://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.012455

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